Private Practice Infectious Disease

(ISSN: 2770-4629) Open Access Journal
Follow us:
Rss Feed:
PPID 2022, 2(3), 11; doi: 10.55636/ppid2030011

Prosthetic Joint Infection Due to Cardiobacterium hominis: Report of First Known Case and Review of C. hominis Septic Arthritis Literature

1 Northeast Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, OH, USA; (P.O.); (C.S.)
2 Infectious Disease Division, Department of Medicine, Summa Health, Akron, OH, USA
3 Infectious Disease Section, Department of Internal Medicine, Northeast Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, OH, USA
* Corresponding author: ; Tel.: +1-(330)-375-3741; Fax: +1-(330)-375-3760
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 Jun 2022 / Revised: 26 Aug 2022 / Accepted: 29 Aug 2022 / Published: 30 Sep 2022
View Full-text Download PDF (231kb)

Abstract

Introduction. The Cardiobacterium species is a pleomorphic Gram-negative bacterium discovered in 1964 and is part of the HACEK (Haemophilus, Aggregatibacter, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella) group of organisms known to cause endocarditis. It has low virulence and can also cause dacryocystitis, septicemia and abdominal abscess. We report a patient with C. hominis prosthetic joint infection in the absence of definitive endocarditis. Case Report. A 57-year-old man presented to his orthopedic surgeon 17 months after left total knee arthroplasty with a 4–5-day history of left knee pain following yard work. He had an aortic valve replacement in 2003, mitral valve repair in 2006 and bovine aortic valve replacement in 2019 (12 months previously). Aspirate of knee joint fluid was grossly cloudy. Two of two preoperative blood cultures revealed Cardiobacterium species after 4 days’ incubation. He was initially treated with intravenous vancomycin plus piperacillin/tazobactam followed by 6 weeks of parenteral ceftriaxone followed by five months of oral cefdinir. Patient is infection-free 6 months after completion of antimicrobial therapy. Discussion. Cardiobacterium hominis is a slow-growing, fastidious, capnophilic, Gram-negative bacillus commonly found in normal oral and upper respiratory flora. Google Scholar™ and PubMed® searches were conducted and this is the first reported case of prosthetic joint infection due to Cardiobacterium hominis. We found three previously reported cases of C. hominis pyogenic arthritis: one patient with native knee pyogenic arthritis, one patient with cervical spondylodiscitis and one patient with lumbar spondylodiscitis and epidural abscess. Two of these three patients had TEE-documented infective endocarditis and one had a bioprosthetic aortic valve without evident vegetation on TEE. Our patient had a bioprosthetic aortic valve without TEE evidence of endocarditis. C. hominis should be added to the list of organisms that can cause bacteremically spread prosthetic joint infection.
Keywords: ; Prosthetic Joint Infection; Group; Bacteremia
OPEN ACCESS
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
CITE
Otchere, P.; Seif, C.; Myers, J.P. Prosthetic Joint Infection Due to Cardiobacterium hominis: Report of First Known Case and Review of C. hominis Septic Arthritis Literature. private_pract_infectious_disease 2022, 2, 11.
Otchere P, Seif C, Myers JP. Prosthetic Joint Infection Due to Cardiobacterium hominis: Report of First Known Case and Review of C. hominis Septic Arthritis Literature. Private Practice Infectious Disease. 2022; 2(3):11.
Otchere, Phoebe; Seif, Christian; Myers, Joseph P. 2022. "Prosthetic Joint Infection Due to Cardiobacterium hominis: Report of First Known Case and Review of C. hominis Septic Arthritis Literature." private_pract_infectious_disease 2, no. 3: 11.
Not implemented
SHARE

Article Versions

Export Article

Journal Browser